Combretum-Copaifera (Sturtevant, 1919)

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Coffea-Colocasia
Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919
Combretum-Copaifera (Sturtevant, 1919)
Corchorus


Combretum butyrosum Tul.

Combretaceae. BUTTER TREE.

Tropical Africa. The Kaffirs call the fatty substance obtained from the fruit chiquito. It is largely used by them as an admixture to their food and is also exported.

Commelina angustifolia ?

Commelinaceae.

The rhizomes contain a good deal of starch mixed with mucilage and are therefore fit for food when cooked.

Commelina coelestis Willd.

BLUE SPIDERWORT.

Mexico. The rhizomes are used as food in India.

Commelina communis Linn.

China. In China, this plant is much cultivated as a potherb, which is eaten in spring.

Commelina latifolia Hochst.

Abyssinia. It is used as a potherb.

Commelina striata ?

The rhizomes are suitable for food.

Comocladia integrifolia Jacq.

Anacardiaceae. BURN-WOOD. MAIDEN PLUM. PAPAW-WOOD.

Tropical America. Lunan says the fruit is eatable but not inviting. The maiden plum of the West Indies, says Morris, is grown as a fruit in the Public Gardens of Jamaica.

Conanthera bifolia Ruiz & Pav.

Haemodoraceae (Tecophilaeaceae).

Chile. The natives of the country make use of the root of this plant in their soups and it is very pleasant to the taste. Molina says the bulbs, when boiled or roasted, are an excellent food. It is called illmu.

Condalia mexicana Schlecht.

Rhamnaceae.

Northern Mexico. The berries are similar to those of C. obovata.

Condalia obovata Hook.

BLUE-WOOD. TEXAN LOGWOOD.

Texas. This plant is a shrub of San Antonio, Texas and westward. The small, deep red berry is acidulous, edible and is used in jellies.

Condalia spathulata A. Gray.

Western Texas. The berries are similar to those of C. obovata.

Conferva sp.

Confervae.

Green cakes are made of the slimy river confervae in Japan, which, pressed and dried, are used as food.

Conium maculatum Linn.

Umbelliferae. HERB BENNET. POISON HEMLOCK.

Europe and the Orient. Poison hemlock has become naturalized in northeastern America from Europe. Although poisonous, says Carpenter, in the south of England, it is comparatively harmless in London and is eaten as a potherb by the peasants of Russia.

Conopodium denudatum Koch.

Umbelliferae. ARNUT. EARTH CHESTNUT. JURNUT. KIPPERNUT. PIGNUT.

Western Europe. The small, tuberous roots of this herb, when boiled or roasted, are available for food and are known as earth chestnuts. In England, says Don, the tubers are frequently dug and eaten by children. When boiled, they are very pleasant. The roots, says Johnson, are edible but are little eaten in England except by children.

Convolvulus arvensis Linn.

Convolvulaceae. FIELD BINDWEED.

Old World tropics, middle Asia and naturalized in America from Europe. This plant gives its flavor to the liquor called noyeau, imported from Martinique, according to Lindley. It reached Philadelphia in 1876 in the packing of exhibits at the Centennial.

Copaifera coleosperma Benth.

Leguminosae.

Tropical Africa. The aril is used in preparing a nourishing drink.

Copaifera hymenaeifolia Moric.

Cuba. This species is said to be the mosibe of eastern tropical Africa, a tree which yields a red-skinned, fattening, bean-like seed.