Antidesma ghaesembilla (PROSEA Fruits)

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Plant Resources of South-East Asia
Introduction
List of species


Antidesma ghaesembilla Gaertner

Family: Euphorbiaceae

Synonyms

  • Antidesma frutescens Jack,
  • Antidesma paniculatum Blume,
  • Antidesma pubescens Roxb.

Vernacular names

  • Black currant tree (En)
  • Indonesia: ande-ande, dempul lelet (Javanese), onyam (Sundanese), kutikata gunung (Ambon), lonang (Kalimantan)
  • Malaysia: balong ayam, gunchak, kunchor puteh (Peninsular), sekincak, kesambi
  • Philippines: binayuyo (Tagalog), arosep (Ilokano), tubo-tubo (Bikol)
  • Burma: pyee-sin, ntenren
  • Cambodia: dângkiep k'daam
  • Laos: 'mao2noy2, 'mao2muak, 'mao2pa siou
  • Thailand: mao-khaipla (Chon Buri), mangmao (Chanthaburi), maothung (Chumphon), mamao khao bao (peninsular)
  • Vietnam: chòi mòi, chop moi, com nguôi.

Distribution

From tropical Africa, Sri Lanka, India and the western Himalayas to Burma (Myanmar), Indo-China, southern China, Thailand, throughout the Malesian region towards the Bismarck Archipelago and northern Australia.

Uses

The fruits are eaten raw and prepared into jams, etc. Young shoots are used as a vegetable and as a spice; the leaves are used in traditional medicine against fever. The wood is red, hard and used for small constructions.

Observations

  • Monoecious tree, 3-12 m tall, deciduous.
  • Leaves ovate to circular, 4-7.5 cm long, glossy above.
  • Flowers in terminal panicles.
  • Fruit a subglobose drupe, 4-5 mm diameter, velvety, dark red-purple.
  • Seeds 1-2.

In open grasslands at low and medium altitudes.

Selected sources

  • Burkill, I.H., 1966. A dictionary of the economic products of the Malay Peninsula. 2nd ed. 2 Volumes. Ministry of Agriculture and Co operatives, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2444 pp.
  • Kurz, W.S., 1877. Forest Flora of British Burma. 2 Volumes. Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta.
  • Merrill, E.D., 1923 1925. An enumeration of Philippine flowering plants. 4 Volumes. Government of the Philippine Islands, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Bureau of Printing, Manila.
  • Morton, J.F., 1987. Fruits of warm climates. Creative Resource Systems Inc., Winterville, N.C., USA. 503 pp.

Authors

P.C.M. Jansen, J. Jukema, L.P.A. Oyen, T.G. van Lingen