Rhus-Rhynchosia (Sturtevant, 1919)

From PlantUse English
Revision as of 19:15, 9 December 2012 by Michel Chauvet (Talk | contribs) (Created page with "{{DISPLAYTITLE:''Rhus-Rhynchosia'' (Sturtevant, 1919)}} {{Turningpage |title=Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919 |titlepreviouspage=Rheum-Rhopalostylis (Sturtevant, 1...")

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Rheum-Rhopalostylis
Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919
Rhus-Rhynchosia (Sturtevant, 1919)
Ribes


Rhus albida Schousb.

Anacardiaceae.

Arabia, Syria and northern Africa. The fruit is edible and is eaten as a condiment.

Rhus aromatica Ait.

FRAGRANT SUMACH.

Northern United States. According to Nuttall, the drupes are acid and edible.

Rhus copallina Linn.

DWARF SUMACH. MOUNTAIN SUMACH.

North America. Elliott5 says the berries are possessed of an agreeable, acid taste and, infused in water, form a pleasant beverage. Pursh 6 says the leaves are used as tobacco by the Indians of the Missouri and Mississippi.

Rhus coriaria Linn.

ELM-LEAVED SUMACH. TANNER'S SUMACH.

Mediterranean region and Persia. At Aleppo, the seeds are used as an appetizer at meals as mustard is in Britain. In India, Brandis says the acid fruit is eaten. Pallas says this is the sumagh or redoul of the Tartars and is employed by them as well as by the Turks in their meat broths, to which they impart a very agreeable acid.

Rhus cotinus Linn.

SMOKE-PLANT.

Mediterranean region, the Orient, Himalayas and China. The leaves were used in China in the fourteenth century.

Rhus glabra Linn.

SCARLET SUMACH. VINEGAR TREE.

North America. Emerson says the velvety, crimson berries of this sumach are of an agreeable, acid taste and are sometimes used as a substitute for lemon juice. Kalm says the boys of Philadelphia eat the berries but they are very sour.

Rhus integrifolia Benth. & Hook. f.

California. The fresh, red berries are described by Palmer as coated with an icy-looking, white substance, which is pleasantly acid and is used by the Indians to make a cooling drink.

Rhus parviflora Roxb.

India. Mixed with salt, the fruit is used like tamarind in the Benar Valley and Bhawar.

Rhus punjabensis J. L. Stew.

Himalayan region. In India, the fruit is eaten.

Rhus semialata Murr.

NUT-GALL TREE.

Eastern Asia. The pulp of the fruit is acid and is eaten in Sikkim and Nepal and used medicinally.

Rhus typhina Linn.

STAGHORN SUMACH. VIRGINIAN SUMACH.

North America. The leaves can be used as ordinary sumach, as Mueller says.

Rhynchosia volubilis Lour.

Leguminosae.

China and Japan. The seeds of the wild plant are used for food in Japan.