Chiogenes-Chorispora (Sturtevant, 1919)

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Chenopodium
Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919
Chiogenes-Chorispora (Sturtevant, 1919)
Chrysanthemum-Cicer


Chiogenes serpyllifolia Salisb.

Vacciniaceae. CREEPING SNOWBERRY.

North America and Japan. The berry is white, edible, juicy and of an agreeable, subacid taste with a pleasant checkerberry flavor. The Indians of Maine use the leaves of the creeping snowberry for tea.

Chloranthus inconspicuus Sw.

Chloranthaceae.

China and Japan. This plant furnishes the flowers which serve to scent some sorts of tea, particularly an expensive sort called chu-lan-cha.

Chlorogalum pomeridianum Kunth.

Liliaceae. AMOLE. SOAPPLANT. WILD POTATO.

California. The egg-shaped bulb is one to three inches in diameter. Cooking eliminates all the acrid properties, rendering the bulb good, wholesome food.

Chondodendron tomentosum Ruiz & Pav.

Menispermaceae. WILD GRAPE.

Peru. This plant is called by the Peruvians wild grape on account of the form of the fruit and its acid and not unpleasant flavor.

Chondrilla juncea Linn.

Compositae.

Southern Europe and adjoining Asia. This plant is mentioned by Dorotheus as good for cooking and for the stomach; it is enumerated by Pliny as among the esculent plants of Egypt.

Chondrilla prenanthoides Vill.

East Mediterranean countries and mountains of Yemen. This plant is enumerated by Pliny as among the esculents of Egypt. Forskal says it is eaten raw in Yemen.

Chondrus crispus Lyngb.

Rhodophyceae. CARRAGEEN. IRISH MOSS. PEARL MOSS.

This alga is found on the western coast of Ireland, England and Europe and also on the eastern coast of the United States. It has been used as a food and medicine by the Irish peasants from time immemorial. It is collected for the market and is largely used as a food for invalids under the names carrageen, Irish moss and pearl moss.

Choretrum candollei F. Muell.

Santalaceae. WILD CURRANTS.

A shrub bearing greenish-red berries which are called wild currants in New South Wales. They have a pleasant, acid taste combined with a certain degree of astringency. Mixed with other fruit, they are used for preserves and in the preparation of cooling, acid beverages.

Chorispora tenella DC.

Cruciferae.

Central Asia. The leaves of this plant are described as a good, early salad by Pallas in his Travels in Russia.