Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.

Aconitum (Sturtevant, 1919)

Revision as of 08:48, 13 July 2019 by Michel Chauvet (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Revision as of 08:48, 13 July 2019 by Michel Chauvet (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Aciphylla
Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919
Aconitum (Sturtevant, 1919)
Acorus


Aconitum lycoctonum

Aconitum lycoctonum Linn. Ranunculaceae. WOLFSBANE.

Middle and northern Europe. The root is collected in Lapland and boiled for food. This species, says Masters in the Treasury of Botany, does not possess such virulent properties as others.

Aconitum napellus

Aconitum napellus Linn. ACONITE. BEAR'S-FOOT. FRIAR'S-CAP. HELMET-FLOWER. LUCKIE'S MUTCH. MONKSHOOD. SOLDIER'SCAP. TURK'S-CAP.

Northern temperate regions. Cultivated in gardens for its flowers. A narcotic poison, aconite, is the product of this species and the plant is given by the Shakers of America as a medicinal herb. In Kunawar, however, the tubers are eaten as a tonic[1].
  1. Flückiger and Hanbury Pharm. 15. 1879.