Gigantochloa-Glyceria (Sturtevant, 1919)

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Geitonoplesium-Geum
Sturtevant, Notes on edible plants, 1919
Gigantochloa-Glyceria (Sturtevant, 1919)
Glycine-Grevillea


Gigantochloa apus Kurz.

Gramineae. BAMBOO.

Java. The young shoots are used as a vegetable.

Gigantochloa ater Kurz.

BAMBOO.

Java. This bamboo in Java attains a height of 70 feet and is extensively cultivated. The young shoots afford a culinary vegetable.

Gigantochloa robusta Kurz.

BAMBOO.

Malay. This bamboo attains the height of a hundred feet. The young shoots are used as a vegetable.

Gigantochloa verticillata Munro.

BAMBOO.

Java. The plant grows to a height of 120 feet, with stems nearly a foot thick. This is one of the most extensively cultivated of ail Asiatic bamboos. The young shoots are used as a culinary vegetable.

Gigartina lichnoides Harvey.

Algae. CEYLON MOSS.

Ceylon moss is a seaweed much used in the East as a nutritive article of food and for giving consistence to other dishes. It is of a very gelatinous nature and when boiled down is almost wholly convertible into jelly.

Ginkgo biloba Linn.

Coniferae. GINKO. MAIDENHAIR TREE.

China and Japan. The fruit of the ginko is sold in the markets in all Chinese towns and is not unlike dried almonds, only whiter, fuller and more round. The natives seem very fond of it, although it is rarely eaten by Europeans. In Japan, the seeds furnish an oil used for eating and burning. The fruit of the maiden-hair tree is called in China pa-kwo. The Chinese consume the nuts of this tree at weddings, the shells being dyed red; they have a fishy taste. This tree is largely cultivated as an ornamental in Europe, Asia and North America.

Gladiolus edulis Burch.

Irideae. EDIBLE GLADIOLUS.

South Africa. The bulb-like roots are edible and taste like chestnuts when roasted.

Glaucium flavum Crantz.

Papaveraceae.

Europe and the Mediterranean regions. This plant furnishes an inodorous and insipid oil of a clear yellow color, sweet, edible and fit for burning.

Gleditsia triacanthos Linn.

Leguminosae. HONEY LOCUST.

North America. This tree, native of the region about the Mississippi and its tributaries, is cultivated as an ornamental tree both in this country and in Europe. The pods contain numerous seeds enveloped in a sweet, pulpy substance, from which a sugar is said to have been extracted. Porcher says a beer is sometimes made by fermenting the sweet pods while fresh.

Glyceria fluitans R. Br.

Gramineae. FLOAT GRASS. MANNA GRASS. POLAND MANNA.

Northern temperate regions. The seeds of this grass are collected on the continent and sold as manna seeds for making puddings and gruel.3 According to Von Heer,4 it is cultivated in Poland.